Saturday, July 8, 2017

Pickled eggs and other drinking snacks 卵の酢漬け、酒の肴

This was the evening line-up of small dishes we had one weekend. Bluefish in miso sauce (left back), pickled egg (right back) and fish cake (store bought) grilled in the toaster oven with soy sauce and grated ginger. 


Among these dishes, pickled eggs are new.


This fish cakes were bought at our Japanese grocery store. They appeared locally made and are fresh not frozen. They come in a simple plastic container without any brand name. Compared to frozen fish cakes, these taste much better and have a nice consistency. Every time we see them at the Japanese grocery store, we get them.


This fish simmered in miso sauce was posted before. Instead of mackerel, I used blue fish. It came out almost identical and is a good way to cook blue fish. For this type of strong fish the combination of miso and ginger flavors works well.


Among these snacks, the pickled eggs were new. Since we often get caught with eggs in the refrigerator with an expiration date that just passed or was about to pass, we thought this might be a way to preserve them and buy a little more time until we got around to eating them. In addition, my wife grew up in rural Pennsylvania where pickled eggs are common and a significant part of a summer picnic. So she decided to make some. While she ate many pickled eggs in her youth, however, she never made any. The traditional PA Dutch pickled eggs are bright red. The color does not come from food coloring but from beets which are used to make the brine and are pickled along with the eggs. My wife knew from experience that beet juice is a great dye i.e. it gets into everything and is impossible to remove. For this reason she was reluctant to go with the traditional red egg and found a recipe for mustard pickled egg. This used turmeric which makes the eggs and the onions blight yellow. (Come to think of it, turmeric is a pretty stubborn stain to remove as well.)

Mustard pickled eggs.
Ingredients:
Hard boiled eggs, 4, peeled
Sweet onion such as Vidalia, medium, sliced in thin strips
2 cups water
1/2 cup vinegar
1/2 Tbs salt
1/2 Tbs mustard seed
1 1/2 Tbs prepared mustard
1/2 tsp. turmeric

Directions: Put eggs and onions in a glass jar. 


Bring everything else to a boil. 


Let cool a few minutes than pour over the eggs and onions. Make sure the eggs and onions are completely covered with the liquid. Seal the jar, put in the fridge and wait at least a week before tasting.  

This should have been a hard boiled egg but this one is somewhere between soft and hard boiled.


Because of the turmeric, egg white became bright yellow.


These were good snacks to start the evening. The pickled eggs had great yellow color and a slight pickled mustard flavor but were otherwise rather bland. This was the first time I ever had pickled eggs and was surprised to find that the consistency of the cooked egg white got much firmer. Actually, the onion was the best part. I am sure my wife will tweak the recipe. She said next time she would reduce the amount of water so the vinegar would be stronger and suggested that maybe the eggs should have been left to marinate a bit longer. (We busted into them after only 5 days.) 

No comments: